Woodfibre LNG Explores Clean Energy

Always looking out for new ideas, new industry and new market to enter into, Sukanto Tanoto has done an intensive research on natural gas and their potential as a clean alternate energy in the future. This project is also strongly supported by his eldest daughter, Imelda Tanoto, who is heavily involved in the whole process from planning to execution. Read here for more information.

Natural gas is increasingly in demand, throughout the developed world and in emerging economies, as an affordable and “clean” source of energy. With production up by more than one-third in the United States compared to a decade ago, natural gas offers attractive options for energy companies and consumers alike. When burned as fuel, natural gas produces only about half the carbon dioxide emitted by coal-powered plants, which makes it popular with many environmentalists. Moreover, according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency, natural gas emits less than one-third the amount of nitrous oxides and about 1 percent the amount of sulfur dioxides as coal. The burning of natural gas also requires a minimal amount of water and does not create any significant concerns regarding disposal of solid waste.

Woodfibre LNG, an arm of the RGE Group’s Pacific Oil & Gas company, is currently working to open an operations plant to liquefy natural gas and export it from western Canada. RGE, directed by founder and CEO Sukanto Tanoto of Indonesia, hopes to make Woodfibre a leading player in the growing international market for natural gas products. In 2014, Woodfibre executives, led by Imelda Tanoto, Mr. Tanoto’s daughter, signed a letter of intent with the government of British Columbia (Premier Christy Clark) to explore options that would benefit both parties as well as the people of the province.

In addition, the 13 million vehicles worldwide currently powered by natural gas produce approximately 30 percent fewer greenhouse gas emissions than those that run on traditional gas and diesel sources. Depending on conditions in local markets, natural gas can be significantly cheaper than other fuel sources, which makes it a good choice for developing economies.

Woodfibre’s proposed Canadian export station would re-purpose a now-unused Vancouver-area pulp mill, located on land with an existing industrial pipeline infrastructure and electrical grid, all of which stand to minimize the impact that constructing an entirely new facility could produce.

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